Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Avian flu highlights need for good air in poultry sheds

April 3, 2018 by  
Filed under Livestock

Recent avian influenza outbreaks have highlighted the need for improved air quality in naturally ventilated free-range poultry sheds, say industry experts.

The increased amount of time that free-range birds have had to remain indoors due to bird flu restrictions has led to reports of negative impacts on flocks. These are often associated with poor air circulation.

Stringent requirements placed on environmentally controlled farm buildings may have seen them adopt modern ventilation techniques such as humidity sensors and high velocity jet extraction fans, but 25% of free-range houses remain naturally ventilated.

But the introduction of even a small amount of added ventilation can have a big impact, says Mike Bowden, managing director at poultry health specialists Bowden & Knights. Stagnant, humid air lacking in fresh oxygen can cause issues for both birds and farm workers, he says.

“The main way of tackling this is to get air moving throughout a shed. In naturally ventilated buildings this means opening the vents, but that then brings its own issues, as you immediately become exposed to the outside environment.

“Ideally, free-range chickens should be housed at approximately 21°C all year round. Opening the vents can cause temperatures to drop, with the added issue that the combination of cold and hot air can lead to increased moisture and, if left for long enough, wet litter.

“Likewise, in summer with all the vents open temperatures can still go above maximum recommendations, causing heat stress, lower feed intake, less eggs in layers, and lower weights in free-range broilers.”

John Lack, general manager at poultry equipment manufacturers Hydor, says these issues can often be overcome by suspending recirculatory fans in the roof – creating a better environment for both birds and workers.

Mr Lack added: “The use of recirculatory fans effectively pulls in fresh air from crooks, crannies and pop holes around the shed, increasing the amount of oxygen available and creating a more pleasant environment for the birds and staff.”

Speak Your Mind

Tell us what you're thinking...
and oh, if you want a pic to show with your comment, go get a gravatar!

 
barbour pas cher barbour pas cher barbour pas cher barbour pas cher barbour pas cher golden goose saldi golden goose saldi golden goose saldi golden goose saldi golden goose saldi doudoune moncler pas cher doudoune moncler pas cher doudoune moncler pas cher doudoune moncler pas cher doudoune moncler pas cher moncler outlet online moncler outlet online moncler outlet online moncler outlet online moncler outlet online