Thursday, November 15, 2018

‘Keep your guard’ on liver fluke, farmers warned

November 1, 2018 by  
Filed under Livestock

Sheep and beef farmers are being urged to keep their eyes on the ball when it comes to liver fluke this autumn.

While liver fluke burdens on pasture are expected to be much lower than last season, experts are warning that it remains dangerous to assume that all farms will escape the threat – or indeed that levels will remain low as the autumn progresses.

Even within individual farms, some parts of the holding may be more vulnerable than others, said Lesley Stubbings, consultant for the Sustainable Control of Parasites in Sheep (SCOPS) and Control of Cattle Parasites Sustainably (COWS) groups.

“So far, reports from around the UK support this advice. Experts are warning that farmers must keep on their guard and are predicting that, due to changes in weather patterns, acute liver fluke cases may occur later than normal.”

Monitor and assess

Ms Stubbings added: “When we get a dry year, it is even more important that each farm does its own risk assessment and carries out monitoring and testing to avoid getting caught out, because there will be huge variation between regions and farms.”

Producers should avoid being caught out by treating too early. Livestock should be monitored to determine the need and timing of treatments. In lower risk situations, consider treating sheep with closantel or nitroxynil rather than triclabendazole.

Worms – including haemonchus, which can produce signs similar to liver fluke disease – may be the problem, particularly in lambs. Producers should keep in mind that haemonchus is also a risk for ewes.

Any losses should be Iinvestigated. A post mortem is still the best way to establish whether liver fluke is present. Similarly, abattoir returns should be monitored and carefully assessed for any evidence of liver fluke.

Monitor and assess

Diana Williams, of Liverpool University and a member of COWS, says: “Snail numbers on farms were high at the beginning of the season. While the hot dry weather caused numbers to drop during July and August in most locations, this was not the case everywhere.”

High numbers of snails observed were some persistently wet habitats. “This means that although overall numbers of snails are likely to be lower, specific areas of pasture may still present a high risk of fluke.”

Speak Your Mind

Tell us what you're thinking...
and oh, if you want a pic to show with your comment, go get a gravatar!

 
barbour pas cher barbour pas cher barbour pas cher barbour pas cher barbour pas cher golden goose saldi golden goose saldi golden goose saldi golden goose saldi golden goose saldi doudoune moncler pas cher doudoune moncler pas cher doudoune moncler pas cher doudoune moncler pas cher doudoune moncler pas cher moncler outlet online moncler outlet online moncler outlet online moncler outlet online moncler outlet online